Coping with Post-Holiday Blues

Coping with Post-Holiday Blues

Do you find it hard getting back into the swing of normal life after the holidays? Most of us do to some extent. The holidays aren’t just a couple of special day after all. We spend all of December preparing, shopping, enjoying festive treats and events and getting excited for the holidays. You might start even earlier, and it can feel like you’re leading an alternate life in the run-up to the big day. Then, there is the weird week when no one knows what day it is, and the passage of time is marked by how many pieces of Quality Street are still in the box.  Suddenly, the tree is down, and we’re back to work/braving school runs and expected to return to normal, as though nothing has happened. Some of us find ourselves dealing with post-holiday blues and even depression. Here are some of the things that you can do to help yourself adjust back to your daily life, minimising the blues as much as possible.  Deal with Any Health Issues Sometimes, the holidays, highlight significant issues with our health and fitness we might have been ignoring for some time. When we’re looking at resolutions or reflecting on the year… View Post
Four Things You’re Giving Up When You Quit Drinking Alcohol

Four Things You’re Giving Up When You Quit Drinking Alcohol

Always do sober what you said you’d do when you were drunk. That’ll teach you to keep your mouth shut. Ernest Hemingway “Don’t you miss it?” — the question I’ve been asked a bunch of times since I quit drinking alcohol. “Sometimes, but not really.” — my usual response. “Well, you’re much more driven than I am, I couldn’t quit drinking, I love my wine too much, how do you stick to it?” — the question I’ve been asked at least half a dozen times since I quit drinking alcohol. “Have you ever had a wine hangover? Thinking about that makes the thought of drinking pass pretty quickly. I guess I’m motivated by waking up clear-headed, feeling rested, and without a head full of anxiety.” -my usual response. So many people view giving up alcohol — or anything really — as being deprived. And I suppose by nature abstaining from anything could be considered deprivation. Or it could be viewed as the opportunity to gain something else in its place. It’s merely a matter of what your relationship is with that something that determines which end of the spectrum not having it will fall. I don’t view giving up alcohol… View Post
New Ways Can’t Open Old Doors

New Ways Can’t Open Old Doors

Did you read that title correctly? Did I write that title correctly? Isn’t it, “old ways won’t open new doors”? But I saw this quote a few times last week and thought it was the universe’s way of letting me know I had to at the very least think about it. The more I thought about it, the more I thought about how my mind wanted to read it as, “new ways can’t open old doors.” When I wholeheartedly decide to make a change in my life – commit to it full-throttle – I find that I can’t go back. Sure, I could go back, but something inside of me always reroutes my urge. For example, when I decided to give up alcohol for good, I took it one day at a time and made a pact with myself that I would not allow the overwhelm of saying, “I’m never going to drink again.” I know that I don’t want to and for the first six months that was enough for me to stick with my commitment. Now, 19 months in, I find that I no longer have the impulse to have a drink when I’m stressed or upset. The… View Post
The Confusing Cognitive Distortion of Quitting Drinking

The Confusing Cognitive Distortion of Quitting Drinking

When you quit drinking, you stop waiting. -Caroline Knapp, Drinking, A Love Story In most facets of life, we are encouraged to not think in polarised – black and white or ‘all-or-nothing’ thinking. These are formally known as cognitive distortions Cognitive distortions are ways that our mind convinces us that a particular belief about ourselves is true, despite contrary evidence that it is not. Living in the grey is logical for most of life’s wonderment. We have to be flexible and open-minded to live in contrast and to attain personal growth. This is true except for that which does not positively serve you. If you want to honour your highest self – your soul consciousness, aka you who is always there, but often disconnected due to your Ego’s interference – you must choose things that serve you and enable you to grow in positive alignment with your path. When it comes to alcohol (or anything that is an addictive component in your life), living in the grey is not an option for some people. So, it’s a confusing cognitive distortion. via GIPHY One cognitive distortion for some drinkers is that they can limit or cut back on how much –… View Post
When Not Drinking Makes Others Uncomfortable

When Not Drinking Makes Others Uncomfortable

When I decided to stop drinking, I understood that coming as a shock to people who know me. I had always been down for cocktails, wine, and drinking socially (and non-socially). So, when I would meet up with people and the conversation of alcohol came up, it would be a needle scratch on the record moment when I would order a diet soda instead of a large glass of cabernet. “ARE YOU PREGNANT?!” No. “ARE YOU DYING?!” No, I mean – we all are, technically, but not yet. “ARE YOU ERIN?!” Now, that’s just rude. I expected this knee-jerk reaction from people who had ever spent any amount of time with me. It was a shock to their system in addition to mine. Then comes the secondary questions: “ARE YOU AN ALCOHOLIC?!” I prefer to not label it as such, but my relationship with alcohol was no longer working for me. “WHY DON’T YOU JUST CUT BACK?!” Been there, done that. It didn’t make sense just to cut back. “ARE YOU NEVER GOING TO DRINK AGAIN?!” I am not a psychic. If I could predict the future, I would have far more interesting insights than whether or not I’m ever… View Post